16 July 2010

Discretion

Wouldn't want to actually post these. Wouldn't want to offend anyone.













17 comments:

Ewe said...

http://daybydayathomeaway.blogspot.com/2010/07/todays-ot-reading.html

MooreMama said...

forget about water turning to wine, what about the part where milk turns to water when the nurseling hits his/her first birthday?

Untamed Shrew said...

I knew of a man who struggled with a pornography addiction. To assist his repentance, he surrounded himself with pictures like these. Good stuff.

But no, I won't keep it in the cry room. :D

Untamed Shrew said...

PS: The world-wide average weaning age is 4.

Dakotapam said...

Those are great! I'm actually impressed by Mary's miraculously stretchy breasts!

Marie said...

That last passage is why I've had a hard time scheduling the baby!

Thanks for these beautiful pictures. I suppose I was so busy writing lesson plans in college that I didn't do too much art-gazing.

I especially like the first, as my boy is at that wiggly nursing stage; fun to think of Jesus like that!

Katy said...

I recognize that expression on Jesus' face in the one of St. John the Sketcher. My Robbie looks like that about 8 times a day (while kicking one leg furiously).

We bought a house last summer and I'm looking for prints to hang. Any suggestions for where to find art (won't-fade) prints? I have Rublev's Trinity icon framed above my mantel (sacramental, trinitarian, Christ in the OT, hospitality; plus it has sweet composition and beautiful colors). I got it off an 2005 icon calendar from B&N.

Rebekah said...

I thought it was nice of the holy apostolic band and the white-robed martyrs to be so supportive. We should also note that squirmy and proxy-exhibitionist nursing on the part of a baby is not a sin.

Katy, I've had some luck with various options at art.com and allposters.com. It took us a long time to get anything hung (and there still isn't much) because I'd rather have nothing than junk.

Pam said...

ROFLOL! These are great!

Oh, and Pam, I was thinking about that too... although I can kinda relate actually, and besides, I don't believe Mary would have worn a bra.

Gauntlets said...

I still like the Boppy scene the best. :) And I additionally still love Mary.

Sarah Osbun said...

My husband had this to say about the list of pictures:

"You cannot claim that "The Guardian of Our Lord Approves" simply because Zurburan painted Joseph into a scene where Mary is breastfeeding. In fact, to make such a claim (and the other claims like it) is to completely miss the point of the artwork. These were not pro-public-breastfeeding pieces of propaganda. Artists showed Mary breastfeeding to confess the incarnation. They painted Jesus nursing at His mother's breast to confess that He is indeed true man, who suffered the humiliation of not being able to feed Himself, just like the rest of us. THAT was the point of showing Mary nursing our Lord. To use it to promote this agenda is to ignore the theological teaching in order to support a political point."

These are not historically accurate paintings. These artists lived centuries after Jesus was nursed at the breast of Mary. Nudity in artwork is not uncommon, nudity in public is uncommon.

Go ahead and nurse discretely in public, just don't use these paintings as a model of modesty.

Anonymous said...

Little chinese baby boy in the museum tries latching onto a bronze.

Hilarious.


http://www.iscute.com/iscute/view.php?g=198&c=Funny+Pictures&b=Baby+nursing+statue

Reb. Mary said...

:D

Rebekah said...

Sarah, respectfully, I rather doubt that the Guardian of our Lord disapproves. That the image of Maria Lactans is a common one in art illustrates that there is historically no scandal in Lactans, for Christians would surely not portray a scandalous image of our Lord or His mother. It is only since the use of artificial infant food and artificial infant feeding devices became the norm (ie in the last century) that the sight of a breastfeeding woman became scandalous. These paintings do, as you say, primarily confess the Incarnation. But beyond that, they make an historical point. It is only in our absurd time that they could be perceived to make a political point.

There are few truly realistic artistic depictions of the crucifixion, though such a depiction would also confess our Lord's incarnation as a vir. But a naked man, historically, is scandalous; a nursing mother is not.

I am also sorry if the humor intended in this post was unclear. It is a sadly hilarious society in which a woman naked in a sexual context is completely acceptable, but the necessities of maternity are disgusting or immodest. If it makes anyone feel any better, I'm a hider and a coverer myself when my baby is hungry. But in general, I think our culture would be better off if a nursing mother was so common a sight as to be unremarkable.

My husband said it was ok for me to post this.

Rebekah said...

(Someone just told me that last sentence sounded catty. I apologize. I asked my husband to read Sarah's comment and then to read the reply I had written before I posted it because I really do make an effort not to say heretical things or embarrass him. And then I was in a hurry to make supper so it came out sounding abrupt.)

Sarah Osbun said...

I did get the humor of the post. I find no scandal nor disgust in Lactans. I would not be offended by a modest woman breastfeeding in public. I do not find other forms of public nudity (especially in a sexual context) acceptable. Nude beaches are insane.

I would be interested in knowing what the Israelite and Christian tradition is for how much a woman shows in public while breastfeeding. How modest was Katherine Luther or the mother of Augustine? Just because someone paints it doesn't mean it actually happened that way (Botticelli's "Birth of Venus" and Michelangelo's "David" didn't mean there were a bunch of men and women running around completely naked). Is it really only in 20th/21st century America that it is unacceptable for a woman's nipple to be seen no matter the context? Unfortunately, not many wrote about the history of this sort of thing, at least not that I can find after a quick internet search.

Rebekah said...

An informative article on the history of such things:

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/01/19/090119fa_fact_lepore?currentPage=all

I'm sure we'd all be very interested to see how, where, and in what company Christian women breastfeed in other times and places. Contemporary Africa or India, for example.